WHAT IS TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT? WHAT DOES IT DO AND WHO DOES IT PROTECT?

WHAT IS TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT? WHAT DOES IT DO AND WHO DOES IT PROTECT?

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a federal law that protects employees from discrimination based on a protected status or characteristics including race, color, national original, sex and religion. Title VII applies to employers with 15 or more employees. Employers may not discriminate against any employee in the terms or conditions of their employment. Employers are prohibited from discriminating against an employee or prospective employee on the basis of a protected characteristic. Discrimination involves an adverse employment action such as failure to hire, failing to promote, terminating an employee on the basis of their color or religion or another protected status. Discrimination can come in several forms including discrimination based on perceived racial, national, sexual or religious characteristics or on the basis of associating with those who are protected.

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